Both here on Asia Options and at AustCham Korea, Scott Walker is an iconic name within the Australia-Korea space! Formerly AustCham Korea’s youngest Board Member (Director), Scott’s transition from student living off $900 a month to Tourist Australia’s Korea Country Manager can be an inspiration to many young professionals. Asia Options had the pleasure of…

A squeeze in the Korean job market has made internships in Korean companies a hot commodity for both foreign students and graduates alike. This is also being felt by Koreans, who are increasingly targeting internships as an opportunity to get a foot in the door at major conglomerates such as Samsung, LG or Hyundai. To…

The English as a Second Language (ESL) industry in Korea remains lucrative and has evolved over the last five years: the industry is becoming more competitive and the number of teaching roles have been cutback to force parents to spend less on the private education sector. For first time job seekers this translates to an over-supply of…

Asia Options recently looked at the start-up trends in Asia and Taiwan, and we’re now proud to bring to you a close-up on South Korea start-up scene. ‘Creative Economy’ is currently one of Korea’s key buzzwords of the new government administration to fuel jobs and stimulate economic growth. The government has opened the doors for more foreign…

The structure of the salary system among Korean companies is vastly different from what many of us will be accustomed to back at home. Western companies typically operate on a job role remuneration system where your pay is linked to your unique job role. Under this system, an accountant, engineer, marketer, administrator, lawyer etc, will all receive varying…

  Rapid economic development in Asia has brought tremendous change to the region but it has also brought significant challenges and gaps in the market, and there is desperate need for entrepreneurial talent. Meanwhile, foreign companies are facing increased pressure from local companies, while traditional jobs for expats are also facing pressure from local talent. Working in…

Applying for a job in Korea is not easy and although most job advertisements targeting foreign professionals will be written in English, there are other opportunities with medium-sized companies which will scout for Korean speaking foreigners. The best place to find these opportunities are on the Korean job website PeopleNJob, Most job adverts in Korea…

The negative aspects of Korean corporate culture such as the notorious overtime hours, low annual wages and poor productivity in white-collar roles often overshadow the positive aspects of a Korean workplace. Korean companies do have some really awesome policies and benefits which are comparable to the well-publicised dream benefits of companies like Google. Now, most…

Korean companies corporate positions and jobs are very hierarchical. Job roles and more importantly remuneration or salary are based on the length of service and experience as opposed to job role based remuneration. It also makes it very difficult for non-Koreans to determine what the appropriate title is for a work colleague or contact in both…